OBJECT RELATIONS 2 READINGS

Object Relations 2

Veronica Csillag, LCSW

113 University Pl. #1005, New York, NY 10003

212 460 5949; 646 284 6659

veronica.csillag@gmail.com

Course objective: This course will review the development of object relations theory from Bion through Segal and Joseph to more contemporary thinkers, such as Green, Bollas, Britton, Grotstein, Ogden, and beyond. Bion’s theories of thinking, concepts of containment, reverie, symbol formation and symbolic equation, impasse and the negative therapeutic reaction will be elucidated. The emergence of the two-person psychoanalytic approach within the object relations world will be addressed. Similarities and differences between the modern object relations schools and the interpersonal tradition will be highlighted. The discussion of relevant literature will be augmented by clinical presentations.

Class 1: Reading Bion

Ogden, T. H. (2012), Reading Bion. In Creative Readings: Essays on Seminal Analytic Works (pp. 97-116). London and New York: Routledge.

Ogden, T. H. (2012), Elements of analytic style. In Creative Readings: Essays on Seminal Analytic Works (pp. 117-137). London and New York: Routledge.

Recommended:

Symington, N. and J., (1996). The Clinical thinking of Wilfred Bion. Chapter 1; Chapter 2. London: Routledge.

 

Class 2: Linking versus evacuation; modification versus evasion of frustration

Bion, W. R. (1959). Attacks on linking. Int. J. Psycho-Anal. 40:308-315.

Bion, W. R. (1962). The psycho-analytic study of thinking. Int. J. Psycho-Anal. 43:306-310.

Ogden. T. H. (1979). On projective identification. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 60:357-373.

Recommended:

Symington, N. and J., (1996). The Clinical thinking of Wilfred Bion. Chapter 7. London: Routledge.

 

Class 3: The psychotic core

Bion, W. R. (1957). Differentiation of the psychotic from the non-psychotic personalities. Int. J. Psycho-Anal. 38: 266-275.

Bion, W. R. (1958). On arrogance. Int. J. Psycho-Anal. 39:144-146.

Symington, N. and J., (1996). The Clinical thinking of Wilfred Bion. Chapter 13. London: Routledge.

 

Class 4: Symbol formation and symbolic equation

Segal, H. (1957). Notes on symbol formation. Int. J. Psycho-Anal. 38:391-397.

Grotstien, J. S. (1983). The work of Hanna Segal: A Kleinian approach to clinical practice: By Hana Segal M.D. New York/London: Jason Aronson, Inc., 1981. 240 pp. The psychaanlytic quarterly, 52:291-295.

 

Class 5: Psychic equilibrium and psychic change

Joseph, B. (1989). The patient who is difficult to reach. In Psychic Equilibrium and Psychic Change (pp. 75-88). London and New York: Tavistock/Routledge. (Original work published 1975).

Joseph, B. (1989). Towards the experiencing of psychic pain. In Psychic Equilibrium and Psychic Change (pp. 88-98). London and New York: Tavistock/Routledge. (Original work published 1975).

Breakthrough: Introduction: Michael Feldman and Elizabeth Bott Spillius (1989). In Psychic Equilibrium and Psychic Change (pp. 47-51). London and New York: Tavistock/Routledge.

 

Class 6: The negative therapeutic reaction

Joseph, B. (1989). Addiction to near death. In Psychic Equilibrium and Psychic Change (pp. 127-138). London and New York: Tavistock/Routledge. (Original work published 1982).

Consolidation: Introduction: Michael Feldman and Elizabeth Bott Spillius (1989). In Psychic Equilibrium and Psychic Change (pp. 101-106). London and New York: Tavistock/Routledge.

Alvarez, A. (1995). Motiveless malignity: Problems in the psychotherapy of psychopathic patients. J. Child Psychother., 21:167-182.

Class 7: The dead mother and other ghosts

Green, A. (1986). The dead mother. In On private madness (pp. 142-173). Madison, CT: International Universities Press. (Original work published 1983).

Britton, R. (1989). The missing link: Parental sexuality in the Oedipus complex. In J. Steiner (Ed.) The Oedipus Complex Today: Clinical Implications (pp. 83-101). London: Karnac Books.

Recommended:

Bollas, C. (1979). The transformational object. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 60:97-107.

Britton, R. (2004). Subjectivity, objectivity, and triangular space. Psychoanal. Q. 73:47-61.

 

Class 8: Reverie

Ogden, T. H. (1994). The analytic third: Working with intersubjective clinical facts. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 75:3-19.

Ogden, T. H. (1997). Reverie and interpretation. Psychoanal. Q. 66:567-595.

 

Class 9: Impasse

Ferro, A. (1993). The impasse within a theory of the analytic field: Possible vertices of observation. Int. J. Psycho-Anal. 74:917-929.

Baranger, M., Baranger, W. (2008). The analytic situation as a dynamic field. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 89:795-826.

 

Class 10: The light militia of the lower sky: “There are more things in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.”

Grotstein, J. S. (2004). “The light militia of the lower sky:” The deeper nature of dreaming and phantasying. Psychoanal. Dial., 14:99-118.

Eigen, M. (2004). A little psyche music. Psychoanal. Dial., 14:119-130.

Harris, A. (2004). The relational unconscious: Commentary on papers by Michael Eigen and James Grotstein. Psychoanal. Dial., 14:131-137.

 

Alternate Class 9/10: The analyst’s private space

Cooper, S. H. (2014). The things we carry: Finding/creating the object and the analyst’s self-reflective participation. Psychoanal. Dial., 24: 621-636.

Corbett, K. (2014). Private space: Spontaneity, ritual, psychotherapeutic action, and self-care. Psychoanal. Dial., 24: 637-647.

Seligman, S. (2014). paying attention and feeling puzzled: The analytic mindset as an agent of therapeutic change. Psychoanal. Dial., 24: 648-662.